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Friday, August 15, 2014

No Light Bulbs (August 15)

UAS FH Construction Update for 8/15/2014

No Light Bulbs (August 15)

Yes that is correct; there are No Light Bulbs in the new UAS Freshman Residential Housing. The Design team has made another bold statement by only using Light Emitting Diode (LED) lights.

The Incandescent Light bulb made successful by Thomas Edison runs electricity through a small metal element until it gets very hot (white hot) which produces light.

The Florescent Light bulbs work by running an electric current through a gas filled tube which produces a short-wave ultraviolet light that then causes a phosphor coating on the inside of the bulb to glow.

For a Neon Light, a clear glass tube is filled with neon, then a small electrical current but several thousand volts passes through the neon gas, causing it to emit a colored light.  Neon emits a red light.  Other gases can be used to get a different color, helium (yellow), carbon dioxide (white) and mercury (blue).  However, they are still referred to neon lights.

 

Light Emitting Diode (LED) Lights work very similarly to standard light bulbs except for the fact that LEDs are much smaller and contain no filament. Instead of a filament, an LED creates light using nothing but the movement of electricity along the path of its semiconductor. As the electrons stream across the semiconductor, they create electromagnetic radiation. Some forms of this electromagnetic radiation can take the form of visible light, which humans can perceive via sight

This is a photo of the inside of the bathroom sink light fixture.  Each of the yellow squares is a LED semiconductor.  The LED’s are about the size of a pencil eraser and there are more than 300 LED’s in one bathroom mirror light fixture. 

Inside and LED Light Fixture

Lights LED Bar

 

Everyone talks about how much less electricity LED lights use.  Which is true, the bathroom mirror light fixture uses only 15-20% of the electricity that a typical bathroom mirror light.   However, us height challenged people love the idea that we may never have to change another light bulb again.  An average LED light will last 50,000 hours or 20-40 years depending on how long you leave it on each day.  LED lights are so efficient and long lasting that mothers everywhere will never have to tell their kids to turn out the lights.  smiley

If you try to buy LED lights at your local store, there is only one style.  However, our design team has access to commercial lighting companies that have some great lighting selections. 

www.lithonia.com

www.lumettainc.com

www.eclipselightinginc.com

www.contrastlighting.com

Just check out some of the great lights in the UAS Freshman Residential Housing.

Ceiling Reflection lights in Commons Room

Lights 2 Commons

 

 

Wall Accent Lights in Commons Room

Lights 3 Commons

 

 

 

Very Bright Light Bars in the Class / Conference Room

Lights Class-Confrence Room

 

 

Hallway Lights

Lights Hallway

 

 

Bedroom Dome Lights

Lights Bedroom

 

 

 

And My favorite  -  Stairway Wall Lights

 Lights LED Can  Lights Hall 1 

 

 

The Contractor is making the final push to complete the building. Rooms are painted, carpet is down, doors hung and lights installed.  There are some finishing work left and they still need to complete the glass curtain walls that have been giving them headaches (see next week blog).   Many of the construction crew have been working 60-80 hour weeks so our UAS Freshmen will have the best room in that nation to start school.  Next time you see one, tell them Thank You.

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